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do the reverse? >> what i say is that generally in the environment we're in thou, we're seeing a pick up in u.s. growth, pick up in chinese growth. we're starting to see a pick up in demand for key industrial commodities. i think at this point you're starting to see investors shift away from the cyclical commodities such as gold. >> it's shifting away from the nor defensive types of assets and even more in the commodities space moving more to the industrials. >> paladium, platinum up at seven-month highs. what is behind that? >> we're starting to see a pick up in growth in china and the u.s. the world's two largest economies. also you're seeing issues on the copper. there are a lot of problems in terms of getting these medals out of the ground. for platinum, 80% of it is produced in south africa. when you have labor issues, it has a big impact on supply. on the palladium side, we have the russian state slowing down substantially. it's stockpiled sales. you're seeing a squeeze -- >> supply side issues, as well. >> absolutely. and you're seeing a pick up in demand. that's been driving p
to their lower costs. but environment minister nobuteru ishihara has expressed his concern. ishihara says building now thermal power plants or expanding existing ones will push up greenhouse gas emissions. >>> people in beijing are struggling through a cloud of smog. a major cause is automobile emissions and one way to tackle the problem is to introduce electric vehicles. nhk's akihiro has the story. >> reporter: in beijing, the problem of air pollution is growing worse. a major source of the smog is the emissions from vehicles. >> translator: i think cars are responsible for most of the emissions in beijing. >> translator: if environmentally friendly cars catch on, i think the situation will improve. >> reporter: the pollution is prompting people to consider electric vehicles. beijing automotive group is one of china's five biggest automakers. it has ties with foreign companies such as daimler and hyundai. it is now stepping up its output of electric vehicles. this brand can produce 20,000 units a year. it has already sold 50 vehicles to a local taxi company and is setting up battery cha
in international environments to help promote humanitarian missions. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way through to today and i know in the future we're already talking about putting together a hot wash of everything we've learned through 2012's fleet week. so rob is going to talk about the van, turkey mission. from turkey we have rear admiral guereva he has more than 14 years sea-going experience serving across various frig
talked a little bit about the culture here. how important is it that the environment here succeeds in continuing to draw people and draw talent and investment? the example we heard in your introduction was you went to school add mit. you came here to start your business. there is another guy on facebook who has said if he had it all to do over again, he would have stayed in boston. how important is that culture and environment? >> it is critical. it is critical to have minds that have been educated, interdisciplinary people coming to the table, different perspectives, that energy and enthusiasm around thinking differently, and around paradigm shifts, around developing breakthrough technologies, and to be able to attract those people to this area is crucial. i think that that is something that has been a benefit of being here, that a lot of people are attracted to silicon valley. that is crucial to any company starting in taking their technology to the next level. >> can you talk about the incubator? >> yes. >> the qb3? >> yes, mission bay, everybody knows. uc san francisco has cond
the environment, fracking is going to get into the water? what's your take on this? >> it has to be done in an environmentally responsible way. the industry knows that. they don't want disasters. one major problem could set the whole thing back. the industry is very careful and the regulators are working closely with the industry this that environmental problem does have to be dealt with. if it can be dealt with, and most experts believe it can be, it unlocks an enormous potent l potential. it's really a technology that will change a lot of things, both in creating jobs and also enabling manufacturing to have a low-cost reliable source of energy and actual gas and also we can use it for power so we won't need to burn as much coal, we won't need to import natural gas, helps our balance of payment bs and by lowering the cost of energy, consumers will have more money in their pockets to spend on other things. >> what a job creator. it's got such potential. we're really seeing nenlg change the game in a number of these industries. energy included, because of innovation. >> absolutely. energ
. risks will come down. but we're still in an environment where you need to focus on the risks out there. >> i don't think that's anytime soon. >> and that will be very important. >> i think investors need to focus on that down the road. for now, it's not going to be a factor pore probably most of the year, we would think. >> and i guess a little surprising is the economy feels like it's starting to turn. if you look at housing, if you look at what we hear from a lot of ceos about what's happening at this very moment, they feel okay with that. it's just when you ask them to give you guidance for the next quarter or the next year, they say they can't see that far. >> and i think it comes down to having things like the ee quester. certainly a reconciliation after the fact that the u.s. is spending so much more than it brings in. i think one of the interesting things, just around rates, bullard yesterday, for example, said that he expects 3% real growth this year. so 3% real growth and 2% inflation, that gets me to march like a 5% ten-year. we're nowhere close to that. lloyd blankfein was o
in the future saying this is a low growth environment. the new norm. as a result, they are all competing for the same market share, which typically, leads to pricing pressure. there's not a bigger pie growing. it's, rather, how do we slice up the pie today. >> spreeing to hear in light of the fact that the stock market is back to historic highs, but that's driven by profits of companies saying they may not have the leverage any longer. interesting to see they feel slower growth in the brick countries, but hope coming from beyond that. >> yeah, uh-huh. this year, the brick countries historically slowed down a little. you have optimism from china in the last six months, but they are moving into the next generation being a malaysia, indonesia, africa, turkey, and the like. corporates focus on that rise in consumer for opportunities to diversify the revenue stream and go after the growth. >> fascinating. look at the consumer at home and what's going on here and holding back, they are worried about the impact of higher taxes on the consumer. 77% of the american population saw the paycheck shr
high quality walking environments. 5 percent of san francisco streets bear 55 percent of all our severe pedestrian injuries. most of them are in distinct 6. now in campos's district it is very real. and, of course, one of our supervisors was hit as well. i want this plan implemented. the funding and gaps if there is one and i'd like to hear about the enforcement as well. i also want to submit an memorandum related to my hearingy. this is a woman who was killed on her bible. she was killed by one of our cement trucks. diane was a regular bike valet parker at our giant game and this sunday the san francisco bike coalition will be doing a ride on her behalf. for those who have not heard about this there was a recent article whoa person who witnessed this incident said she was stopped at a traffic light and she was sitting on her bike at the light and the truck driver was there as well. her body was caught in her bike spoke and she bleed out. while they paint a line in the pedestrian crosswalk it does fade. but your wishes and thoughts go out to diane's family and we would like toy that we
, a political environment that could, in fact, i in danger and threaten the civil freedoms of the united states, if all of a sudden the american people demand a response that congress feels it must respond and civil liberties could be the first thing that goes overboard. you mentioned the national defense authorization act. i think it's a very legitimate concern. one of the principal focu focusf our advisory panel, principle focuses was whether or not and how you use the military in the homeland. if you create a panic or a stress environment in the united states, there is a danger that the executive branch will simply respond and use whatever resources are available to it without regard to law or restrictions such as -- which, of course, we know a doctrine that prohibits the use of military and homeland. it was one of the five principal focuses of our advisory panel, our concern over this type of environment. the ndaa, the national defense authorization act in fact in our view does begin to move the military into a domestic responsibility and into a domestic function. this is not good. and that
in volume is really a natural occurrence in this environment. > you are just back from china. what did you find there? > > lots of pollution. i was in beijing for two days. i have been in china numerous times, and this was by far the worst i've ever seen it. but, aside from that, you look at the economy, things are moving. it is bouncing right along, and they are rebalancing the economy. you can see the service sector, the financial sector, different things moving. so i think in general things are moving in china. there is still a lot to be done and a lot of reform to be done, not the least of which is clean air and clean water. but i think these are things, initiatives to look forward to, and other than that, i think china is moving as expected, if not better. > we will take out our pollution put there tim. and what about the united states? what worries you about the market here? > > you know, not a lot worries me right now in this market. it is liquidity-driven. the fed is buying 80% of the treasury, which is unbelievable. i never thought i'd see that. so i think as long as that occurs,
environment to persist in 2013. >> reporter: a stronger euro makes imports of u.s. goods cheaper, and that could give some u.s. companies a boost in european sales. >> they'll get the most benefit from taking those euros that they earn abroad in europe and bringing them back home to the united states, where the currency has now become a little bit weaker. it'll have a little bit of a tailwind to their profits. >> reporter: much of the money printing in the u.s. and japan will likely pour into developing economies as investors hunt for bigger returns, but it could also inflate the currencies of those countries and create an asset bubble. >> the more monetary easing we see in the major economies, the more we are going to see a move towards interventionism and capital controls in the emerging economies. >> reporter: analysts say, come the g-20 meeting this weekend in moscow, any talk of a currency war will likely take place behind closed doors and away from the scrutiny of currency watchers. ruben ramirez, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: those tensions over foreign currencies will be
too in a negative real interest rate environment but we are a little bit more underweight this year than we were last year just because we think the risk of economic global calamity is certainly less than it was at this time last year. so don't see gold as strong as it was last year. david: kevin, this is what i don't understand about the current market. a lot of people say it is not going to be growing this year as much as it was last year. last year we had all the uncertainty. uncertainty about europe. uncertainty who would get elected in the state. uncertainty if the president was reelected what would happen with taxes. we have a lot of uncertainty nailed down or more or less so. we still have questions about the debt, et cetera. with more certainty now why isn't the market set to increase as much this year as it did last year? >> well, when you get, when you have more risk you have more reward, right? when you have more certainty, certainty l certainly we've seen a rally on that. but we would be surprised we saw the returns for 2013 like we did in 2012 because there was more unc
representatives of local governments and the environment industry in tokyo met to set up a task force, planning to share information on the problem and discuss preventive measures. ministry officials said they need more observation points to detect minute pollutants called pm 2.5. they are found in exhaust and factory smoke. the ministry is drawing up guidelines on protecting people's health if the density of pm 2.5 rises. >> translator: it's close to china. people there are increasingly concerned about the issue. we want the central government to discuss the matter and clearly show us the results as soon as possible. >> authorities in tokyo and osaka have started to provide pollution data online. >>> naval officers from mainly asian pacific countries have gathered in japan to discuss security it is aimed at promoting mutual understanding in the region. on monday 15 officers took part in an opening ceremony at japan's maritime staff college in tokyo. they represent 15 countries, including japan, the u.s., south korea, china, and australia. the director of the college's research department says
that authorities can find out if it has harmed the environment. >> north korea is so poor. if the situation becomes worse, this city will be flooded with north korean refugees. >> the un security council has condemned the north korean nuclear attacks and said that they will take further action, but if new sanctions are to be introduced, they will have to employ china as the main backer. beijing will want to send a tough message to pyongyang, that this type of behavior will not be tolerated. and if the sanctions and not tough enough, they may get away with this nuclear attack. but if the sanctions are too harsh, north korea may lash out again. >> martin patients on the border between north korea and china. magazine editors have defended their decision to publish those of the duchess of cambridge on a private holiday. the royal family says the pictures are an invasion of privacy. six months ago the same italian government magazine published photos of the duchess on holiday in france. we are joined now by the australian women's day magazine, planning to publish the photos on monday. nick, what does th
environment is still a very difficult place to grow tools. radical. it's on the book shelves now. we'll have a little bit more with michelle
i characterize as a slaughter of innocents, has a new environment. it is difficult, but that's not the way we should approach this. we're looking at common-sense measures. for instance let's ban the high capacity magazines. let's take a look at the loopholes in background checks. let's close them down. and then yes the assault style weapons should not be in civilian life. there are many people on both sides of the aisle who concur with that effort. yes, we should have mental health services. what we ought to be doing is listening to the families. listening to their stories listening to them as to what they believe their responsibility is in terms of moving forward. we are not talking about taking people's guns away. we are talking about some common-sense measures, which we ought to be able to pass in a bipartisan way in this institution. that's the way we need to approach this. it's not that it's a tough fight, that we need to climb a mountain, but we need to move on behalf of these families, and millions of families who have lost loved ones over the years. >> michael: i thin
are not generally willing to pay for access to content. in a digital environment. they are interesting -- they are interested in supporting brands. i think they are interested and still willing to pay for experience. experiences are different than access. to be a little bit more precise about this, the old model used to be you give us $35 and we give you 20 issues of print. for a very long time, until the web and all the business models were disrupted. now, our model is you give us $35 and you get print but you also get our experiential products. it did -- the digital colom is all the things i was talking about before. unlimited access, commenting, several things in that list. you get access to subscriber- only events, which we are doing at least once a month in major cities and some secondary markets, ann arbor, austin, places where there are a lot of people interested in the type of journalism we do. whether or not that will be enough is an open question pri is certainly part of the trend where journalists are not just researching and writing. they are researching, writing, promoting
environment than impactor traffic operations. the test sites will also inform the agents he has we develop standards for certifying unmanned aircraft to determine the necessary air-traffic requirements. in addition to the test sites, essay is published a notice in the federal register, asking the public to review privacy language and provided good. the broad outline of the privacy proposal will require each site to ensure their privacy policies address the following. notice for awareness, choice and consent, access and participation, integrity and security and finally, enforcement mechanisms to do with violations of these policies. the faa thinks a test sites will provide important information that will inform our uas process moving forward. with respect to research and development efforts, we are working in four areas. control and communication, maintenance and repair and human factors. research in all four areas is critical as the opening statements have mentioned. a written statement contains more details on each area, but i'd like to take a moment to highlight the work we are doing wit
our ability to grow our economy and provide an environment where all americans have the opportunity to lead healthy, safe and productive life. that's what brings us together here today, because sequestration is about more than numbers on a ledger. they are real people behind these numbers and their lives and livelihoods are on the line. these cuts have consequences, and every american will pay the price. with fewer food inspectors will be more susceptible to foodborne illness. will be a greater risk of deadly disease outbreak as public health laboratory schools. with fewer air traffic controllers, flights will be curtailed. classroom size will increase as teachers are laid off. national parks will close. we will be less safe with fewer police on the streets, and we will wait longer to cure debilitating diseases like cancer and alzheimer's. today, ndd united is sentiments of congress and the white house a 72 page letter signed by 3200 national, state and local organizations, including those represented here today, to stop the political brinkmanship come to stop cutting for cutting sa
. it will need to be done in an environment where as we broaden the base, we both contribute to deficit reduction and hopefully are able to lower rates. on the business side, we have a contradiction in our fiscal tax system. our statutory rate is high. our effective rate is not as high. when you look at the united states against other countries, it the statutory rate makes the u.s. look unattractive compared to others. for individual firms, their average tax rate is much lower because of all of the complicated provisions that are part of the code now. it would be a challenge to take on those individual credit. there's no way way to bring the rate down. that is something i think we need to do to maintain competitiveness abroad. >> you still believe that going down the road we need to reduce that to get the rate down? >> i do. when one looks at a table of international tax rates, it stands up at u.s. statutory rate is high. it is a complicated story to tell that the average rate is lower. it does not affect all businesses equally. we need a simpler tax code. >> could you briefly comment on somethin
to learn how uas operate in different environments and how they impact air traffic operations. the test sites also inform the agency as we develop standards for certifying unmanned aircraft and determine the necessary air traffic requirements. in addition to the test sites, faa is publishing a notice in the federal register asking the public to review draft privacy language and provide input. the broad outline of faa's privacy proposal will require each test site to ensure their privacy policies address the following: notice or awareness, choice and consent, access and participation, integrity and security, and, finally, enforcement mechanisms to deal with violations of these policies. the faa thinks the test sites will provide important information that will inform our integration process moving forward. with respect to faa east research and development efforts, we are working in four areas, void, control and communication, maintenance and repair, and human factors. research in all four areas are critical as the opening statements mentioned. my written statement contains more details o
on retirement, security, the environment, homeland security, minority health and health disparities and he is been a consist president supporter of the national institute of health and our mission and the work we do. he was elected to the senate in 2006 where he currently serves on the finances, public relations and business committees. he serves as co-chair on the security commission in europe. prior to this he represented mary mayor's third congressional district in the house of representatives. and before that in the maryland house of delegates where he served from 1967 to 1978. he was speaker. >> he is a champion for medical research support for maryland's world class university hopkins university of maryland and several others. and he is a strong supporter of our state's biotech industry which is not located here by chance. he's also been i think a strong supporter throughout all of this as the importance of looking for curious for many diseases and protect our citizens from bioattacks. >> he's been here in a town meeting. we arrive here today at a particularly interesting moment give
of domestic investors that usually have less demand to increase interest rates for the environment suggest so. >> okay. marco -- >> so at the end of the day, i don't see increase of interest expense drastic for japan in the medium term. >> right, right. well, that's the worry to some extent. but anyway, marco bardelli joining us from singapore. >>> meanwhile, the bank of hong kong did keep its benchmark rate steady overnight. still, suggestions about concerns over stimulus policies gives us some surprise. chery, what exactly did the bank of korea say about japan? >> although the bank of korea governor did not name japan and tried to stay diplomatic in the press conference today, he did say there are down side risks to the korean economy like a possible fiscal tightening by many countries and the issue of a foreign exchange rate. japan's aggressive monetary easing drive can take toll on korea's exports as they account for about half of the economy. and this on top of the recently weaker yen and the strengthening yuan that has hurt investor sentiment here on the kospi, particularly in the auto
to promote that her emotional and create environments for young people and families feel comfortable asking for help. and i'm counting on doctors to the community conversations. the care you provide for patients will always be your first job. today there's many other ways for not yours to make a difference in people's lives, starting with contribute to transformation of our health care system. we've made great progress in the last few years. i look forward to working on that progress in creating a health system that patients, not yours in this country deserve. thank you offer what you do each and every day. [applause] >> up next, the agricultural committee looks at the impact of lester's extreme weather conditions on american farmers. nobel prize winner, robert pulwarty says this year will likely be drier. farmers also testify to the hearing as chair debbie stabenow called for a passage of five-year farm bill. >> well, good morning. the committee will come to order. we're so pleased to have our first session this year and we'll talk about our new members and no one. while we have a quorum,
, that it's special on the central bank to bring about an environment of price stability ask put the government on the central bank. understand that you need fiscal consolidation, you need price stability for long-term sustainable growth. there is, of course, difference of view in the short-term, a difference of perception depending on where you're sitting. but i don't think you should see that as a major division. international quart nation or at least a shared understanding on the implications of individual country policies, especially systemically important countries, domestic policies, lower impact on emerging economies. and i believe that advanced economies, systemically important economies must be sensitive to the lower impact of their policies. >> also speaking on the sidelines of the g-20, australia's deputy prime minister dismissed talk of a currency war, but did admit that a stopping aussie/dollar is a concern and key to australia's economy. >> we saw a huge crash in commodity prices in the second half of last year and that relied heavily on our revenues. and part and p
. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> it will be cooler today. cold front on the way for tomorrow. i mine, it will get much, much colder on tuesday. more on that coming up in about five minutes. >>> 7:13. firefighters are still working to contain a large fire burning at a metal recycling center in tampa, florida. they are using both water and foam to try and control the flames. within the past 30 minutes we learned that two diesel tanks are filled with not ammonia but calcium nitrate. they say that chemical is less reactive but still dangerous. >>> a state lawmaker says the state may be pushing too hard to recover money from feel who start wildfires. the sacramento "bee" reports for the past eight years, california has aggressively pursued individuals and businesses who start fires. that money is used to cover the costs of fig
to believe them. melissa: how do you pick your bets in this environment? do you buy the index? do you buy etf? do you buy real estate? >> i like etf's. you know that. the symbol is rfp. it says if it is a broadening, rising market, you want to get into the goal weight etf's. you want to get the equal movement. melissa: david kotok, thank you so much for coming on. lori: senate democrats are offering an alternative plan. republicans already saying it does not stand a chance. here is rich and sends in washington with the latest. rich: congress settle taxes earlier this year. they are offering a minimum 30% effective tax rate for income for more than a million dollars. cutting spending on the military that appears to drop anyway. ending direct farm subsidies. the white house approves saying republicans in congress face a simple choice. do they protect investments and health care or do they continue to prioritize and protect tax loopholes that benefit the very few? republicans are waiting for the senate to vote first. >> when the senate passes a plan, we will be happy to take a look at it. until
that are better places to the entrepreneurs and others. >> we need to provide an environment that says we want you to do good business and create jobs but also going to support u.s. people in your own personal agendas to help your community and nation and someone. connell: what are you doing? >> united nations foundation made a commitment to entrepreneurs to help them stepped into not only their business but their philanthropy and using their technology and innovation to help solve global problems. connell: where are you making the most progress? are there surprising results? people would say go to the united states go to silicon valley there are plenty of entrepreneurs but are there other places where it is surprisingly you are seeing strong growth in entrepreneurs? >> in the development space is interesting, not just charity anymore but i am going to create some innovations that might save lives. if you look at malaria deaths have been cut in half in 11 countries in the last five years that is the cause technology of the long-lasting, entrepreneur created. connell: not just people throwing money
what it is like to be a policy maker trying to do different things in a partisan environment that have come to make the case why the fiscal challenges are so pressing. it is still import we were to come with a comprehensive plan to address them. campaign to fix the debt has been around for not very long but has amassed a tremendous group of support. from citizens across the country where we have 350,000 citizens to have joined the campaign, a present in 50 states, active organizations in 23 states in growing, partnerships with 205,000 small businesses. , and organizations all coming together in a way the country has to to explain why making tough choices of putting in place the policies that were required to get a hold of our nation's fiscal challenges is so important. i am proud to be joined by this tremendous group of former members of congress. i am going to turn it over to one of our three cochairs. do you have senator judd gregg and a few other people representing this new council. thank you very much. >> it is a pleasure to be here was so many of my former colleagues to serve thi
of the city, which was fountain square and environs. >> infrastructure. >> we had an infrastructure strategy. develop the banks, which is the river front. and begin to redevelop -- >> not your banks. the banks of the river. >> i was on board. >> the banks of the river. not the other banks. to your point, at the local level, a group came together, it was clearly in all of the stakeholders -- >> and that's a lot better than going to the federal government begging for that money and then the rest of the 49 states pay for it. >> it's all about leadership. if somebody has the courage, you know, to make a declaration about what winning might be, i think you'd be surprised at the number of americans that would stand up and stand behind it. >> so, a year ago, we'll just, you know, you did run. &g, we'd be remiss. >> three years ago. >> right. but a year ago, i looked at your successor and he was, i mean, there were -- did you make barbarians at the gate? who did you say made that up? >> eddie -- >> but he did and you got in trouble for saying it. anyway, for whatever reasons, mcdonald's was under as
have, you know, an intensification of the context. that is when the environment really became a partisan issue. that is when because that is when the business started lining up more business that it not want to run on the regulation wind up with republicans and then the environmental groups lined up with democrats, and that became much more than it had been the past. so there was the clinton impeachment. you can go on both sides. you can see how there is this back-and-forth, but i argue in the book. like gerrymandering, you know, you did this to me. i'm going to get you, but it is not as deep or is important as this inability in the 21st century for us to keep in balance these two parts of the american psyche, and i think, although i don't try to deal with them. i do believe that the anxiety that comes, especially for a man , along about of stagnation for the middle-class has a lot to do with why people are ineffective to an argument, makers and takers here. and there are people who are basically taking things from the government that they don't deserve. and in the 2012 electi
would land. we focused on those environments because the trajectory was that you could land in the desert or the jungle. so we did that. we also did a lot of geology training. i don't recall any training that we did that i felt in the end was worthless that we wasted our time. we did thousands of hours in the simulator, learning how to fly. we did a lot of geology, i probably got a masters degree in geology during my six years of training. the training was very thorough on apollo and we felt well prepared. >> we have time for one more question. way out in the back there. >> hi. i'm a student member of the explorer's club. you mentioned being on the backside of the moon alone would have been a strange experience. i want to know if space exploration is part of the human experience or is it more of a technical kind of quest. when you were on the moon or on your way to the moon, did you feel more human, less human or just the right amount of human? and what is your favorite sci fi movie? >> it was a human, experience. in fact, there is an exhibition -- exhibit touring with nasa
? >> i think the white house has done quite a bit and frankly in today's political environment the truth is you always have to find something to complain about, something to throw rocks at, and border security just happens to be it for the time being or the conversation about the white house's essentially a statement of principles, so i think in the current environment something is going to get done. you can tell by all the activity. you can tell by the fact that tempers are high right now and all of that bodes well for the final passage of the immigration bill this session of congress. >> tempers, tension, clearly high and it is not always just about the specifics of the plan. let me play for you a clip of what senator mccain had to say on "meet the press." >> we're working together, republicans and democrats. by the way, he's had no communications with republicans on the issue unlike the previous four presidents i have dealt with. >> he is not happy about barack obama. he says he is not reached out to republicans, and what role do you think the president can and could most effectively
got to give them a transparent environment to make the decision in. >> still another quarter, which indicates the enormous range of the subject matter, arbitration. is it a legitimate part of the legal system, or is it just a private system of justice? >> both. it is both. it is a private system of justice. unfortunately, it is only available very often to people who have money. again, what we call the rent-a- judge system exists today. you have retired judges you can hire four between $500.1000 dollars an hour to adjudicate your case -- hire for between five under dollars and -- 5 hundred dollars -- $500 and $1000 an hour to adjudicator case. there is foreclosure. the supreme court said we need mandatory mediation before trial to try and do away with the logjam we have. mediation is a very useful and efficient way of handling some cases. many cases. it is part of the future of the practice of law. they can be the only part of the practice of law that we use to resolve disputes. >> 30 minutes to go. we are in good shape. i have not been aware of how the time works here. i am learnin
environment then. we didn't have public sector unions. we didn't have all these regulatory barriers. the problem is that the things that rick talks about are so much more expensive when administered by the government than they would be by the private sector. >> you got ten seconds, wrap it up. >> working today! it's 20 and. it's working now. it's -- >> no it's not. >> it's also working in flint, michigan, this exact program. it's bringing business in. doing all the things you like. >> we got to wrap it up at that. coming up, mountain dew. as your life and career change, fidelity is there for your personal economy, helping you readjust your retirement plan along the way. rethink how you're invested. and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today, a fidelity ira has a wide range of investment choices to help you fine-tune your personal economy. call today and we'll make it easy to move that old 401(k) to a fidelity no-fee ira.
these wpa projects worked, but we had a different environment then. we didn't have public sector unions. we didn't have all these regulatory barriers. the problem is that the things that rick talks about are so much more expensivehen administered by the government than they would be by the private sector. >> you got ten seconds, wrap it up. >> working today! it's 20 and. it's working now. it's -- >> no it's not. >> it's also working in flint, michigan, this exact program it's bringing business in. doing all the things you like. >> we got to wrap it up at that. coming up, mountain dew.
and to not repeat the abuses of the past with forced labor or raping the environment. it is our impression here at the u.s. asean business council that that is in keeping with the reform agenda of the, of the present government and, and we're working in the hopes that that's true because our companies, wherever they go, want transparency, accountability adherence to the highest environmental standards. >> and american investment in burma would have some added strategic benefit. >> there's a geopolitical dimension of it as well. myanmar was closer to china. then there's an opportunity for the u.s. and the west to have an influence on economic and even political affairs of this important and strategically-located country. so, it's not just a game of economic and business opportunities, but also a broader geopolitical influence on an important country in the asian region. >> we don't need to run an anti-chinese foreign policy, but i think, you know, broadly speaking, it's, it's, it's good to have a, a southeast asia that's democratic, market-oriented, integrated into the global economy and burma w
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